Sporty or formal? Classic or unconventional? Finding your style groove can be tricky, especially since your taste and preferences do evolve over time. If you’re in the midst of a style growth or evolution yourself, why not take notes from the concluded Milan Fashion Week?

Racer meets underground grunge at Bottega Veneta
Following Daniel Lee’s new appointment as its new creative director, Bottega Veneta’s latest collection is a breath of fresh air that still retains the label’s DNA. Weaving remains a focal point in the lineup, albeit deconstructed for a modern vibe, and light knits and mesh are juxtaposed with the heavier cuts of asymmetrical wool jackets. Puffy leather jackets and pants provide a sleek moto vibe, while 3D laser-cut leather panels and triangular inserts add textural details.

 

Mountaineering-inspired sportswear by Bally
Hikers and mountaineers get a style upgrade with Bally’s latest collection offering a variety of highly functional pieces that work well in great heights: violet leather ski jackets, cream-colored hand-embroidered sweaters, and cornflower blue fuzzy knits. Heart and mountain motifs, along with strong logo branding, are prominent on utilitarian backpacks and stylized belt bags, while high-cut technicolor hiking boots and draw-string camper sneakers complete the look.

 

A bold new world at Salvatore Ferragamo
Giullaume Meilland, Salvatore Ferragamo men’s ready-to-wear design director, sent out a runway collection that was filled with bold, vivid colors and patchworked garments made of buttery soft suede and lightweight Napa leather. Inspired by the brand’s archival pieces, the clothes were treated like nuanced works of art: tailored jackets with invisible drawstring waists, a mix of gossamer and nubby sweaters, duchess satin puffers, and long and supple leather top coats. The iconic Gancio buckle motif can be seen across belts, shoes, and trunk bags.

 

UJOH’s sleek minimalism
Designer Mitsuru Nishizaki’s fall/winter 2019 collection is a reflection of his 10-year expertise in pattern-making. Cuts continue to experiment with volume and proportion while allowing fabric movement to be appreciated by the body, and streamlined coats, minimalist shirts, and sleek pants are made masculine with a basic color palette of black, white, navy, and gray. Puffer jackets are also made sustainable with the use of eco-friendly Saldarini cashmere flakes in replacement of goose feathers.

Writer: Melo Albert

Bottega Veneta, Bally, and Salvatore Ferragamo photos by Melo Albert. UJOH images via the Negri Firman PR and Communication