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Menswear report from the Milan fall/winter 2016 runways

By Jerico VillamonteDecember 12, 2016

Milan—January was that time of the year again when fashion editors, creative stylists, blogger-moguls, and even celebrities would flock the streets of the Italian fashion capital to witness famous fashion houses present their new menswear collections. While fall and winter seasons are mostly associated with monotonous black, the explosion of colors on one notable runway said otherwise. And as if the injection of colors were not enough, masculine prints and patterns equally took center stage.

All in the details

Bottega Veneta creative director Tomas Maier claimed he was inspired by the idea of reflecting everyday life with his new collection, hence the label’s prescribed new daily uniform minus the unnecessary ornamentation. The collection was all about the silhouette: Maier wanted to create lines that were long and lean.

Velvet double-breasted blazers showcased fine tailoring while suit pants were rather relaxed to provide more breathing room for doing everyday chores. The color palette was toned down, with plaids in sober autumn hues and cashmere sweaters that were mostly in gray tones, but there were also the occasional red and blue to break the monotony. Fabrication also played an important role: needle-punched wool checks, cotton-linen velvet, and the odd rubber added visual and textual interest.

Sensory overload 

From a bright red coat to paint-splattered shoes, Salvatore Ferragamo showcased a line-up that could overwhelm the senses. Boldly hued jackets and statement coats in upscale plaids mixed with graphic knit sweaters and printed long-sleeved silk shirts, and vibrant tops were balanced by slightly cropped and tapered pants in neutral tones.

Chevron and Prince of Wales were the dominant patterns while shearling, cashmere, and wool were key fabrics. Accessories were minimal: tinted shades, suede bags, and silk scarves worn cowboy-style. The shoes, inspired by Andy Warhol, were lined with colored fur, rounding up a collection of menswear separates that can take the metrosexual man from the corporate setting to a post-work life of leisure. Melo Albert